LOTAs’ Election Thoughts

LOTAs%27+Election+Thoughts

Photo by BBC News

On November 3, Americans of the correct age voted in the presidential election. Not everyone voted on that day, many people voted using mail-in ballots and they voted early. This happened due to risks of contracting and exposing others to coronavirus. Though most Holy Cross students could not vote, the election was on their minds especially, as the school prepares them to one day vote. They learned about the election process and about voting in the future.

Students were looking forward to this election for several reasons. Many feel as though it is a very politically tense time in America and so this election will end up determining so much.

“Yes, I definitely was anticipating this election. I feel like there is so much to be decided in this election,” sophomore Grace Bryant said. “It’s been something that ,I guess, you could say I’ve been somewhat looking forward to for a bit now.” 

Because students had been thinking about the election quite a bit, it had an effect on the mental health of students. Additionally, the fact that the election took days to determine a winner also affected LOTAs’ minds. Holy Cross offered its students resources and people to talk to about their stress and worries, scheduling time with counselors, social studies teachers to give context, and members from campus ministry staff. Stress and anxiety levels have increased as thoughts of the election dwelled in LOTAs’ thoughts.

“For me, my stress and anxiety levels are not as much as others,” junior Cassidy Mahaney explained. ”I obviously still did have my worries but maybe not as much as some other people did, you know?”

The election process can be confusing and hard to understand. In America the Electoral College process is used to determine the results of the election. 

“Yeah, I do understand the process a bit. I know that each state has a certain number of electoral votes and whichever candidate wins in that state gets those votes given to the state,” Bryant remarked. “The candidate that gets to 270 wins the election.”

The election process is not over after the election date though. A lot happens between now and January when the President-elect is inaugurated into office. Liz Baldacci, history and social studies teacher, remarked on what happens now.

“In December the electorate will meet and cast their ballots. The vice-president certifies it and then, in January the president-elect, Joe Biden, will be inaugurated into office,” Baldacci explained.

The election is something that AHC students were thinking about for quite some time. Holy Cross has prepared its students to think about the election process and one day voting. 

“I’m a big fan of knowledge is power. I’m teaching my students to vote with the values that Holy Cross emphasizes, courage, compassion, and scholarship,” Creamer explained.