Service Hours at Holy Cross

An+alternative+way+of+doing+service+hours--creating+cards+for+troops.+

An alternative way of doing service hours--creating cards for troops.

Holy Cross is dedicated not only to education but also to community service. All students are required to do at least 20 hours of service every year, except seniors who are required to do 15 hours of service.

“Serving my community has helped me gain a better understanding of how others live and how sometime I may take things for granted,” freshman Prisha Francis said. “It gives me the realization how I should be grateful for what I have and not complain.”

Due to coronavirus, Holy Cross students were given alternative ways of completing their service hours that could be done from home. This included making cards, cooking food, making blankets, and sewing masks.

“My favorite thing about doing service hours is actually helping people and giving back to others,” said sophmore Ivy Fernandes.

As a Catholic school, Holy Cross teaches that serving others is called on by Christ and everyone has a story that should be heard.

“Regardless of one’s religious affiliation, all of us are called to serve others because of Christ’s example,” said Director of Social Justice Emily Teter. “Service hours help students to move beyond themselves and work to see the dignity of each person that they serve.”

Although only a minimum of 20 hours are required, students frequently go above and beyond.

Teter’s advice on service hours is, “Don’t wait to start your hours until right before they are due, but also to be willing to get outside of your comfort zone a bit when you’re serving.”

The goal of the social justice program is to give more to people who have less by fostering a spirit of generosity and equality.

“They are hopefully encountering Christ through serving others and seeing him in those that they serve,” said Teter.

Service hours allow students to integrate what they are learning in Theology classes in a very practical way.

“Serving others always requires us to be a little vulnerable and to give of ourselves,” Teter shared.